Panel #1 - STEM in High School 

November 02, 2021 at 6 PM EST over Zoom
 

Students in a Science Class
Fixing a Toycar

Introduction:

 

How can a high school student prepare for a STEM career? Is it too early? What if I want to apply into a STEM school or major for college? These types of questions are common for high school students who either know STEM is for them or are interested in learning more about one of its vibrant fields. Nowadays, it is largely up to students to find opportunities and explore their interests. 

Specifically with STEM, it can be hard to know where to begin. Through this panel, we hope to shed light on how high school students can take advantage of their four years to become immersed in STEM and get set up for success in college and beyond. Setting up a plan of action now can help you gain depth in your STEM activities and become a capable leader!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sayeed Khan

Student at Stony Brook University

Major in Neurobiology and minor in History

Co-Host of Chai With the Pre-Med Guys Podcast

Student Research Intern at Albany Medical Center & SBU's Worm Lab 

Contact Sayeed on Linkedin:  

https://www.linkedin.com/in/sayeedkhan1

Nina Tedeschi

Student at Johns Hopkins University

Major in Biomedical/Mechanical Engineering

Intern and Volunteer at the Wadsworth Center 

Team Member at Polair LLC (develop next generation PPE)

Contact Nina on Linkedin:  

https://www.linkedin.com/in/nina-tedeschi-bb27ba1b9

 

Henry Li

Student at Cornell University

Major in Information Science

Technical Project Manager at Cornell Design & Tech Initiative

Software Engineer Intern for Amazon Web Services

Contact Henry on Linkedin:  

https://www.linkedin.com/in/henryli6

Alima Ahmed

BS/MD Student at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences and Upstate Medical University

Major in Microbiology

Research Intern at the Neural Stem Cell Institute and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals 

President of Local American Medical Student Association Chapter

Contact Alima on Linkedin: 

https://www.linkedin.com/in/alima-ahmed

Meghana Bhupati

Student at Guilderland High School

Founder of Illuminate STEM and Saturday Scholars 

Research Intern at Albany Medical College 

Field Ambassador for the Northeastern NY American Red Cross 

Contact Meghana on Linkedin:  

https://www.linkedin.com/in/meghana-bhupati-95721619a

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Learning Outcomes:

 

1. High school is the perfect time to build a strong STEM foundation

  • You don’t have to wait until the end of your four years to try STEM activities
  • High school can be of the most formative times for a STEM student

  • You can establish your STEM passions before you even get to college 

2. Learning outcome 2 - There are many STEM opportunities available to high school students

  • STEM organizations, scientists, and more want young students to explore
  • You can make your own STEM opportunities by pursuing a passion project

  • Don’t feel like you have to do everything so try things that make you excited and pursue them wholeheartedly

3. Learning outcome 3 - A STEM mentor can enrich a high school student’s journey

  • STEM professionals want to guide the next generation and help their talent flourish

  • Mentors show you what it is like to pursue a real career in STEM

  • Mentors connect you to opportunities and advocate for your strengths 

Specifications:

High school students will be told what no one has told them before. They don’t need to pursue every STEM activity but can try to find what makes them happy. There is no such thing as a traditional STEM opportunity and although they may feel restricted as high school students, their initiative has power. Paying attention to which experiences they enjoy can catapult their STEM journey and they should try not to be afraid of dropping something if it feels empty and uninspiring.